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The Evolution of Compliance: Structural Changes Which Led to Compliance 2.0

Thomas Fox – FCPA Compliance Report – May 26, 2016

If there was one theme from Compliance Week 2016 it was the continued evolution of the Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) role and the compliance profession. Long gone are the days when someone is sent over from a legal department into the compliance department or worse, some lawyer who is just given the title of CCO and this is considered to be a best practice or even sufficient. In the opening keynote presentation, representatives from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) made clear they expect a CCO to know more than simply the laws of anti-corruption, they must actually work to do compliance in an organization. A key metric of doing compliance is the independence of the CCO and compliance function.

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Read this article on the FCPA Compliance Report.

Social Media Week Part VI – Social Media and CCO 3.0

Thomas Fox – The FCPA Compliance Report – August 10, 2015

I conclude this exploration of the uses of social media in doing compliance by exploring why the compliance function is uniquely suited to using social media tools. Long gone are the days when Chief Compliance Officers (CCO) or compliance practitioners were lawyers housed in the Legal Department or the General Counsel’s (GC’s) office writing policies and procedures and then putting on eight hour training programs on same. Donna Boehme has written passionately about CCO 2.0 and the structural change to separate the CCO role from that of the GC because of the differences in focus of a CCO and GC. Simply put, a GC and legal department is there to protect the company while the CCO and compliance function exists to solve problems before the company needs protections from them.

Freed of the constraints to write policies and procedures by lawyers for lawyers, the profession has moved to integrating compliance directly into the fabric of the company. I often say that a Foreign Corrupt Practices (FCPA) compliance program is a business solution to a legal problem. The problem is how to comply with the FCPA and other anti-corruption regimes. The solution is to burn compliance into the DNA of your company so that it is not only owned by the business unit but also acted on by the business unit in its day-to-day operations.

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Read this article on the FCPA Compliance Report.